Floria Banks: Transitioning From College Life to the Professional World

by User Not Found | Feb 20, 2015
Original: Edward Drogos July 10, 2014

"The balance of work and study was what really made the internship most valuable. It was a mesh of all the skills I actually needed for any job that I would have to do in the future."

Floria Banks'13 Psychology (English Minor), Intern for Girl World at Alternatives, Inc.

Alumna Floria Banks excelled in her undergraduate classes, but wanted guidance on transitioning into the professional world. The UIC College of Liberal Arts and Sciences’ English pre-internship and internship courses, 202 and 493, gave her the tools to prepare for a career. "The guidance provided in those classes proved to be valuable because they provided background in interacting professionally,” stated Floria.

Floria found an internship opportunity where she could use both her psychology and English major skills. "I was instantly attracted to a huge mentorship program at Girl World at Alternatives, Inc.,” she explained. “Once hired, I helped facilitate the organization’s communication with a girl’s school in South Korea. I did a lot of writing and event planning, but I was also able to help the girls work through personal issues affecting them at home, at school, and in the surrounding community."

While interning a minimum of fourteen hours a week and taking the English 493 internship course, Floria received six academic credit hours. "The balance of work and study was what really made the internship most valuable,” explained Floria. “It was a mesh of all the skills I actually needed for any job that I would have to do in the future."

"Now that I’ve graduated, I work as an academic advisor at the Cortiva Institute of Massage Therapy Joliet Campus. I help more than 100 students stay on track towards graduation. My job allows me to participate in educational research, statistical analysis, and assessment," Floria concluded. "It may seem like a lot for an entry level position, but it's a decent amount of responsibility for a great start in higher education."